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Energy Management System


DEXCell is an energy management and savings online software through energy consumption analysis, alerts, reports and recommendations.

DEXCell is compatible with existing devices/meters and systems of measurement and control.



Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending November 1, 2014)

October 31, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending November 1, 2014)

October 30, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Two Years After Hurricane Sandy, a Reminder of What Utilities Faced as the Storm Approached
A look at why the storm’s devastation was so hard to predict, and for utilities to prepare for.
Kevin Bullis, senior editor, materials

Will a Breakthrough Solar Technology See the Light of Day?

October 30, 2014

A startup that might have a record-breaking solar cell is in danger of going out of business.

The power unit is a rectangular slab about the size of a movie theater screen. It’s mounted on a thick steel post, and equipped with a tracking mechanism that continuously points it at the sun. The slab is made of over 100,000 small lenses and an equal number of even smaller solar cells, each the size of the tip of a ballpoint pen. This contraption is part of one of the most efficient solar power devices ever made.

Blame the Weather for Last Year’s Rise in U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions

October 28, 2014

Carbon emissions have been trending downward, but not quickly enough to offset fluctuations in weather patterns.

A colder winter was one of the main reasons carbon dioxide emissions from energy use rose in the United States by 2.5 percent in 2013, according to new data from the Energy Information Agency. Besides a small rise in the price of natural gas and slightly cheaper coal, the weather played the biggest role in in pushing up emissions, the IEA says.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending October 25, 2014)

October 24, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending October 25, 2014)

October 23, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

In Conversation: Marc Andreessen
This Q&A with early Web pioneer turned vocal venture capitalist Marc Andreessen gives a sense for his provocative, if sometimes glib, thinking on technology.
Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief

Why Solar Is Much More Costly Than Wind or Hydro

October 22, 2014

A new report from the E.U. estimates the true economic cost of different forms of energy production.

It’s no surprise that if environmental costs are considered, renewables—particularly wind power—are a far better bargain than coal power. But it might surprise many that according to a new such analysis, solar power lags far behind wind and even hydroelectric power in its economic impact, at least in the European Union.

China’s GMO Stockpile

October 21, 2014

With its world-leading research investments and vast size, China will dominate the future of genetically modified food—despite the resistance of its population.

It is a hot, smoggy July weekend in Beijing, and the gates to the Forbidden City are thronged with tens of thousands of sweat-drenched tourists. Few make the trek to the city’s east side and its more tranquil China Agricultural Museum, where several formal buildings are set amid sparkling ponds ringed by lotus plants in full pink bloom. The site, which is attached to the Ministry of Agriculture, promises that it will “acquaint visitors with the brilliant agricultural history of China”—but what’s missing from the official presentation is as telling as what’s on display.

From the Editor

October 21, 2014

At 2:15 p.m. on august 31, 1910, Colonel Roosevelt (as the ex-president, proud of his “crowded hour” on San Juan Hill, preferred to be known) climbed onto a kitchen table in a grove near Osawatomie, Kansas, and delivered the most radical speech of his life.

Does Lockheed Martin Really Have a Breakthrough Fusion Machine?

October 20, 2014

Lockheed Martin says it will have a small fusion reactor prototype in five years but offers no data.

Lockheed Martin’s announcement last week that it had secretly developed a promising design for a compact nuclear fusion reactor has met with excitement but also skepticism over the basic feasibility of its approach.