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Energy Management System


DEXCell is an energy management and savings online software through energy consumption analysis, alerts, reports and recommendations.

DEXCell is compatible with existing devices/meters and systems of measurement and control.



Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending December 20, 2014)

December 19, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending December 20, 2014)

December 18, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Back to the Future: Advanced Nuclear Energy and the Battle Against Climate Change
A thoughtful exploration of Transatomic Power’s elegant ideas for ultra-safe nuclear energy and whether they can become reality.
Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

Can Japan Recapture Its Solar Power?

December 18, 2014

The way the Land of the Rising Sun built and lost its dominance in photovoltaics shows just how vulnerable renewables remain to changing politics and national policies.

It’s 38 °C on the Atsumi Peninsula southwest of Tokyo: a deadly heat wave has been gripping much of Japan late this summer. Inside the offices of a newly built power plant operated by the plastics company Mitsui Chemicals, the AC is blasting. Outside, 215,000 solar panels are converting the blistering sunlight into 50 megawatts of electricity for the local grid. Three 118-meter-high wind turbines erected at the site add six megawatts of generation capacity to back up the solar panels during the winter.

The Cost of Trolling

December 18, 2014

In “The Troll Hunters,” Adrian Chen writes, “Old-school hate is having a sort of renaissance online, and in the countries thought to be furthest beyond it. The anonymity provided by the Internet fosters communities where people can feed on each other’s hate.”

Lima Climate Accord Might Boost Renewables

December 16, 2014

Nations agree to start drafting climate action plans, which could encourage greater investment in clean energy.

The United Nations climate negotiations that concluded over the weekend in Lima, Peru, included an agreement among 190 nations—rich and poor—to develop action plans over the next several months outlining how they will work to avert climate change. It is the first time so many nations have agreed to make such commitments.

Chip-Making Tools Produce Ultra-Efficient Solar Cells

December 16, 2014

Equipment for making microchips has led to solar cells that are twice as efficient as conventional ones.

Soitec, a French manufacturing company, says it has used techniques designed for making microprocessors to produce solar cells with a record-setting efficiency of 46 percent, converting more than twice as much sunlight into electricity as conventional cells.

Desalination out of Desperation

December 16, 2014

Severe droughts are forcing researchers to rethink how technology can increase the supply of fresh water.

Even in drought-stricken California, San Diego stands out. It gets less rain than parched Los Angeles or Fresno. The region has less groundwater than many other parts of the state. And more than 80 percent of water for homes and businesses is imported from sources that are increasingly stressed. The Colorado River is so overtaxed that it rarely reaches the sea; water originating in the Sacramento River delta, more than 400 miles north, was rationed by state officials this year, cutting off some farmers in California’s Central Valley from their main source of irrigation. San Diego County, hot, dry, and increasingly populous, offers a preview of where much of the world is headed. So too does a recent decision by the county government: it is building the largest seawater desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere, at a cost of $1 billion.

Forget Hydrogen Cars, and Buy a Hybrid

December 12, 2014

Hybrids are a much more cost-effective way to reduce carbon emissions than newly released hydrogen fuel cell cars.

If you want to help cut greenhouse gas emissions, you should probably skip the hydrogen fuel cell cars now coming to market and buy a (much cheaper) hybrid instead.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending December 13, 2014)

December 12, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending December 13, 2014)

December 11, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

We Can’t Trust Uber
Two academics make the case that Uber and other companies collecting sensitive information about our lives should be subject to independent oversight of how they use and protect our data.
Tom Simonite, San Francisco bureau chief