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Energy Management System


DEXCell is an energy management and savings online software through energy consumption analysis, alerts, reports and recommendations.

DEXCell is compatible with existing devices/meters and systems of measurement and control.



Controlled Crystals Make a New Solar Material Practical

August 31, 2014

A new kind of low-cost, high efficiency solar cell emerges thanks to crystals known as perovskites.

A new way to control the growth of crystalline materials called perovskites could lead to commercial solar cells that hit a sweet spot of high performance and low cost. Although individual perovskite cells have achieved promising results in the lab, until now it hasn’t been clear how they might be made in uniform batches.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending August 30, 2014)

August 29, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending August 30, 2014)

August 28, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Robots with Their Heads in the Clouds
UC Berkeley’s Ken Golden on robots, the cloud, and why Google is building a driverless car.
Nanette Byrnes, senior editor, Business Reports

Progress on a Powerful New Way to Generate Electricity

August 28, 2014

A powerful new way to generate electricity could eventually make electric cars and electronic gadgets run longer.

About four years ago, researchers in Michael Strano’s chemical engineering lab at MIT coated a short piece of yarn made of carbon nanotubes with TNT and lit one end with a laser. It sparkled and burned like a fuse, demonstrating a new way to generate electricity that produces phenomenal amounts of power.

Germany and Canada Are Building Water Splitters to Store Renewable Energy

August 27, 2014

Improving technology is making electrolysis a viable way to store excess energy from renewable sources.

Germany, which has come to rely heavily on wind and solar power in recent years, is launching more than 20 demonstration projects that involve storing energy by splitting water into hydrogen gas and oxygen. The projects could help establish whether electrolysis, as the technology is known, could address one of the biggest looming challenges for renewable energy—its intermittency.

The Search For Extraterrestrial Civilizations' Waste Energy

August 27, 2014

If they’re out there, other advanced civilisations should be emitting waste energy like hot exhaust. And that provides a good way to spot them, argue SETI experts.


Back in 1974, the American astronomer Michael Hart published a paper in the Quarterly Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society entitled “An Explanation For The Absence Of Extraterrestrials On Earth”. In it, he pointed out that there are no intelligent beings from outer space on Earth now, a statement that he famously referred to as Fact A.

A Chip for Longer-Lasting Wearable Computers

August 27, 2014

Batteries for smart watches and other wearables never last long. A new microchip design could change that.

Existing wearable devices such as Google’s head-mounted computer Google Glass require battery charging at least once a day, even with light use. A new kind of low-power chip aimed at such wearable devices could not only extend battery lives but also allow the devices to constantly listen for voice commands.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending August 23, 2014)

August 22, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Wireless Power for Minuscule Medical Implants

August 21, 2014

A novel way of powering implanted devices could enable new ways to control appetite, regulate insulin, and treat brain injuries.

Medical implants like pacemakers, deep brain stimulators, and cochlear implants could someday be joined by still more bioelectronic gadgets—devices that regulate insulin levels, control appetite, lower blood sugar, or treat brain injuries (see “Nerve-Stimulating Implant Could Lower Blood Pressure”).

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending August 23, 2014)

August 21, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Seeds of Doubt
The New Yorker’s Michael Specter picks up where David Rotman left off in our January cover story and challenges the opposition to genetically modified foods.
Brian Bergstein, deputy editor