Visit our DEMO

Energy Management System


DEXCell is an energy management and savings online software through energy consumption analysis, alerts, reports and recommendations.

DEXCell is compatible with existing devices/meters and systems of measurement and control.



The Cost of Limiting Climate Change Could Double without Carbon Capture Technology

April 18, 2014

The economics of combating climate change may depend on an underfunded technology.

When it comes to technology for averting climate change, renewable energy often gets the limelight. But a relatively neglected technology—capturing carbon dioxide from power plants—could have a far bigger impact on the economics of dealing with climate change, according to a U.N. report released earlier this week.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending April 19, 2014)

April 18, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending April 19, 2014)

April 17, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

In Space, Pee Is for Power
Could urine be turned into electricity on space stations?
—Colby Wheeler, manager of information technology

Selling Teslas in China Won’t Do Much for the Environment

April 17, 2014

Because China relies so heavily on coal for power, electric vehicles aren’t necessarily an improvement over gasoline-powered cars.

Sales of electric vehicles in China, the world’s largest auto market, have been minuscule despite government incentives meant to put five million of the cars on the nation’s roads by 2020. Tesla Motors hopes to begin changing that as it makes its first deliveries of Model S sedans to customers in China this month.

Averting Disastrous Climate Change Could Depend on Unproven Technologies

April 14, 2014

A U.N. climate report says we’ll overshoot greenhouse gas targets, and will need new technologies to make up for it.

A U.N. climate report released on Sunday concludes that there may still be time to limit global warming to an increase of two degrees Celsius or less, which could help the world avoid the worst effects of climate change. But doing so will depend on making extraordinary changes to energy infrastructure at a much faster pace than is happening now, and may require the use of controversial and unproven technologies for pulling greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.

Does Musk’s Gigafactory Make Sense?

April 14, 2014

Tesla’s audacious plan to build a giant battery factory may mostly be a clever negotiating tactic.

Lithium-ion batteries are just about everywhere—they power almost all smartphones, tablets, and laptops. Yet Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla Motors, says he intends to build a factory in the United States three years from now that will more than double the world’s total lithium-ion battery production. The plan is still in its early stages, but already four states are negotiating with Tesla in the hope of becoming the factory’s home.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending April 12, 2014)

April 11, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

The Forecasting Challenge for Power Networks of the Future

April 11, 2014

The energy-efficient power networks of the future will require entirely new ways of forecasting demand on the scale of individual households. That won’t be easy.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending April 12, 2014)

April 10, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Stimulation Restores Some Function for 4 Paralyzed Men
The video and interactive graphic help round out the hopes and hows of USA Today’s story on an experimental treatment for people with spinal cord injuries.
Susan Young, biomedicine editor

A Less Resource-Intensive Way to Make Ethanol

April 09, 2014

Stanford researchers develop a copper catalyst that can efficiently convert carbon monoxide and water to ethanol.

Today, nearly all ethanol fuel is made from corn or sugarcane, which requires vast tracts of land and huge quantities of water and fertilizer. Researchers at Stanford University have now developed an electrochemical process that could be far cheaper and better for the environment.