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Energy Management System


DEXCell is an energy management and savings online software through energy consumption analysis, alerts, reports and recommendations.

DEXCell is compatible with existing devices/meters and systems of measurement and control.



Construction Begins at a Carbon-Capture Plant, but Will It Ever Be Completed?

September 15, 2014

A FutureGen project in Illinois aimed at capturing carbon dioxide from a rebuilt coal power plant is threatened by a lawsuit and a deadline.

After a decade of stop-and-start efforts and a $1 billion federal pledge, construction of the country’s most hyped project for capturing carbon dioxide from a coal-fired power plant and storing it underground has finally begun. But even now, the project, called FutureGen, faces hurdles. An environmental group has brought a lawsuit against the project that threatens to undermine the additional funding needed to see the job through.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending September 13, 2014)

September 12, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Surging Carbon Dioxide Shows Clean Tech Failure

September 11, 2014

Record levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide reflect a healthier economy, cheap fossil fuels, and the absence of effective carbon-reducing policies.

Wind, solar, and other clean energy technologies have sprouted around the world in recent years, and deployment surged in 2013. Yet taken together, they still failed to prevent 2013 from notching the largest single-year growth in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations since the mid-1980s.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending September 13, 2014)

September 11, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

The Jack Ma Way
The New York Times profiles the Alibaba founder in advance of the company’s IPO.
Brian Bergstein, deputy editor

A Super-Strong and Lightweight New Material

September 11, 2014

Nanostructured ceramics could be used to build lighter, stronger airplanes and batteries.

A new type of material, made up of nanoscale struts crisscrossed like the struts of a tiny Eiffel Tower, is one of the strongest and lightest substances ever made.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending September 6, 2014)

September 05, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

The Masked Avengers
The New Yorker has a long piece about Anonymous, tracing its history and the people behind some of its best-known attacks.
Nanette Byrnes, senior editor, Business Reports

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending September 6, 2014)

September 05, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Controlled Crystals Make a New Solar Material Practical

August 31, 2014

A new kind of low-cost, high efficiency solar cell emerges thanks to crystals known as perovskites.

A new way to control the growth of crystalline materials called perovskites could lead to commercial solar cells that hit a sweet spot of high performance and low cost. Although individual perovskite cells have achieved promising results in the lab, until now it hasn’t been clear how they might be made in uniform batches.

Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending August 30, 2014)

August 29, 2014

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending August 30, 2014)

August 28, 2014

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

Robots with Their Heads in the Clouds
UC Berkeley’s Ken Golden on robots, the cloud, and why Google is building a driverless car.
Nanette Byrnes, senior editor, Business Reports